Newsletter

Click here to view this newsletter in a separate window.

Home Connection
Debi Alleway Debi Alleway &
Jerry DesRoches

416.443.0300 (Office)

debialleway@royallepage.ca

Royal LePage Signature Realty
#201 - 8 Sampson Mews
Toronto, ON M3C 0H5

In this issue...
· 'Delayed Start' in Canadian Real Estate Market and Undersupply Lead to Perceived Housing Boom
· Cold Weather Fun for the Kids
· Grandma's Coming to Live with Us
none

'Delayed Start' in Canadian Real Estate Market and Undersupply Lead to Perceived Housing Boom
none
Canada's housing market is on the road to recovery but is experiencing a pronounced undersupply of homes for sale in southern Ontario and other regions of the country, according to the Royal LePage House Price Survey. With the recession retreating, the report found that home prices are stabilizing and unit sales are increasingly driven by improved affordability.

The market's strong showing in the third quarter has led some commentators to refer to the current conditions as the beginning of a real estate boom. Royal LePage cautions that the increase in sales activity and firming of house prices are the product of a normal market correction and not the beginning of another aggressive expansionary cycle.

"The 2009 real estate market has seen sales activity lagging approximately one month behind the typical seasonal patterns," said Phil Soper, president and chief executive, Royal LePage Real Estate Services. "The economic recession halted the flow of the real estate cycle from the fourth quarter of 2008 through the first quarter of 2009, but it is essentially now back on track albeit delayed. Once housing supply returns to normal levels, we believe the economy will support modest pricing growth into 2010."

Royal LePage's third quarter report shows that the average price of a two storey home in Canada was comparable to a year ago (up 0.1 per cent) at $409,335. Average bungalow values increased 0.06 per cent year-over-year to $341,146, while the price of an average condominium increased 0.09 per cent to $243,748.

Improved affordability is the biggest driver of current real estate activity levels, Soper added. "With the widespread availability of affordable mortgage financing, and only modest increases in home prices, affordability is better now than it has been in a number of years. We expect house prices and interest rates to remain relatively stable into next spring which would keep affordability levels intact."

 

For more information, please see the Royal LePage Survey of Canadian House Prices at www.royallepage.ca.

If you are wondering what your home is worth in today’s market, please contact me and let me put my expertise to work for you!


Survey of Canadian Average House Prices in the Third Quarter 2009

Survey of Canadian Average House Prices in the Third Quarter 2009

Average house prices are based on an average of all sub-markets examined in the area, except for the smaller markets of Charlottetown, Moncton, Fredericton, Saint John and Victoria.

none

none Cold Weather Fun for the Kids

"I'm bored!" No matter how many movies, video games or toys the kids have, you're going to hear those two words sooner or later. So what do you need to keep your kids happy when they're stuck indoors? All it takes is a little imagination!

Bottle-bowling. Find a soft-textured ball to use as a bowling ball. Place some pillows against the wall at the end of a hallway. Line up some empty plastic water or pop bottles a metre in front of the pillows and you have an instant bowling alley.

Camping trip anyone? Ask the kids if they'd like to go on a camping trip without leaving home. You'll need some grass (a green blanket or towels), a tent (a sheet or blanket placed over two chairs), and a few pieces of bristol board for the kids to cut out trees, flowers, or a campfire. A few stuffed animals placed around the campsite will help set the scene.

Little bakers. Mix up some gingerbread dough and let the little ones use different shaped cookie cutters to make cookies. Once cooled, they could decorate them with colourful icing and candies (messy but fun and yummy).

Shadow drawing. Get a roll of plain brown paper and have each child lie on it, and then trace their outline. Once cut out, they'll enjoy drawing in their own features, or creating a funny character that will have them chuckling.

Make your own book. Ask the kids to make up a story that they have to write down and illustrate with paint or markers. Use binders to keep all their stories together so you can enjoy reading them in years to come. A great keepsake.

Future film-makers. Pull out some dress-up clothes, charge up the video camera and get the kids to make a movie. They can act out scenes from their favourite movies, or just run with their own ideas. Next stop, Hollywood!

Story-time. Having everyone curl up with a cup of hot chocolate and marshmallows to listen to a story is one of the coziest of winter pastimes - and best of all, no batteries required!

none
none Grandma's Coming to Live with Us

When different generations live together under the same roof it can be a very rewarding experience for all members of the family. Sitting down together to have a meal, talk, or watch a movie is a great way to keep a family close. However, everyone likes to have their own space now and then, so if you're planning a home renovation to accommodate grandparents, here are some tips to ensure that the new space is comfortable and senior-safe.

Kitchen. If your renovations include the addition of a small kitchen, keep it simple with a counter top range, microwave, toaster and electric kettle. Heavy items should be stored in lower cupboards, and a non-slip footstool should be handy for easy access to upper shelves.

Bathroom. Where possible, it would be ideal to provide a separate bathroom. Walk-in showers are easier than tubs for elderly people to get in and out of. For added safety install some slip grips on the floor and put in a shower bench and hand held showerhead. A toilet riser base, plus a grab bar on the wall, will make life easier and safer for grandma too.

Fall Prevention. Falls are one of the biggest worries for seniors, and the major tripping hazards are pets, wires and rugs. For this reason, thick cushioned carpeting is preferable to slippery rugs or hardwood flooring. To reduce the risk of accidents keep rooms and high-traffic areas clutter-free.

Furniture Safety. Secure bookcases and heavy furniture to the walls and try to avoid furniture with sharp corners; choose round or oval tables if possible. Grandma will likely want to keep some familiar pieces, but depending on the size of her new place in your home, it may be wise to share excess furniture with other family members, put it in storage, or even sell it.

If a grandparent is relocating to an entirely new area to move in with you, try to make the transition as comfortable and enjoyable as possible. Consider looking into senior programs in your community. A good starting point may be your local Recreation Centre. Everyone likes company in their own age group from time to time, and if grandma is happy, you'll be happy too!

All offices are independently owned and operated, except those offices marked as "Royal LePage Real Estate Services Ltd." Not intended to solicit currently listed properties. The above information is from sources believed reliable, however, no responsibility is assumed for the accuracy of this information.

©2009 Brookfield Real Estate Services Fund.